Mitsubishi sets new annual sales record in Australia

From the press release on AutoNews:

“Mitsubishi Motors Australia established a new annual sales record of 84,944 vehicles in 2018, according to official VFACTS figures released today.

The record annual result capped a solid year for Mitsubishi with sales up 5.3% year-on-year against an overall decline of 3.0% in the new car market.

Triton was Mitsubishi’s best-selling model last year with over 24,000 units sold. 

ASX and Outlander contributed over 19,000 and 15,000 sales respectively, with the ASX maintaining its position as the best-selling small SUV in 2018.

Mitsubishi Motors Australia, CEO, John Signoriello said the market last year was much more challenging than anticipated but the investment in our SUV and LCV model range had delivered a good outcome for the brand.”

The ASX isn’t something I would buy given that it is nearing obsolescence, however this goes to show that in a cutthroat segment of the market, heavy discounting that undercuts better competitors works. It would be fascinating to see how much of a profit dealers are making on the ASX. The model itself was first introduced in 2010 and is based on a platform first introduced in 2005 - and given the dated technologies being used, would be cheap to manufacture; however, this would be offset by the discounted prices.

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Above: Mitsubishi ASX

Another thing this result demonstrates is the strong growth of SUVs and Utes in the Australian market over passenger cars (i.e. sedans/hatchbacks/station wagons). The age of the family sedan which had the Commodore, Falcon and Camry as its flagbearers is at an end. Over the last 10-15 years, Mitsubishi has shifted to an SUV/Ute dominant strategy, with the positively ancient Lancer and Mirage the only passenger cars in the lineup. Based on these results, it seems the company has put its eggs in the right basket.

Lexus UX: Australian pricing and specifications revealed

Lexus has announced pricing and specifications of the all-new UX crossover prior to its launch in the Australian market later this month. Let’s have a look at how the UX compares to its key rivals:

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It’s clear from the above table that the Audi Q2, rather than the Lexus, offers the best price/performance ratio, with the cheapest price but also the best fuel consumption and second fastest acceleration.

Moreover, whilst the design of the vehicle includes on-trend elements such as a full-width rear light bar, I find the overall design of the car to be distasteful. This is especially the case with the side profile, with excessive creasing and character lines that fail to create any cohesion, and an awkwardly proportioned, excessively wide C-pillar.

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